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THE SOUNDS OF SILENCE
LISTENING TO GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

Stephen Hawking lost his ability to speak in 1985, more than three decades before the scientific community beamed his message of 'peace, hope and universal harmony' into a black hole 3500 years away, in loving memory of a man much beyond our times.
Stephen Hawking may have never recovered his real voice in his lifetime but his message will live on in the solitary silence of the universe for billions of years ahead.
It is an elementary human understanding that space is a virtual vacuum impermeable to noise. Yet, when we probe beyond our horizons, we find such regal wonders of an unimaginable scale, that we are left to ponder if the silences in space really mean that the universe isn't trying to communicate with us.
However, it is. The universe continues to speak to us in a million different ways. If we could just listen beyond the synthesized noises we blanket our planet with, the universe has stories to tell. Stories much beyond the Age of Man.

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An artist's impression of gravitational waves generated by binary neutron stars. US researchers said on Feb. 11 2016 they have detected gravitational waves, which physicist Albert Einstein first described 100 years ago as 'ripples in the fabric of space-time.'

Beyond the Age of his Planet.
Beyond the Age of our sun and stars.
The Universe has been around for a long time and we have only just begun to listen to it. Gravitational Waves are said to be ripples in the space-time fabric. They are, to put it in simple terms, mere messengers from the Cosmos.

They are speaking of mighty neutron star collisions,
Singing ballads of supernovas they once witnessed,
Relaying their swan songs for the dying stars
And whispering truths about what lies beyond our conscious mind.

Scientists at LIGO, MIT and CalTech have only begun to study their forms and decrypt the tales they hold.
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a large-scale physics experiment and observatory designed to detect cosmic gravitational waves and to develop gravitational-wave observations as an astronomical tool.
The gravitational waves from black hole mergers imprint a distinctive whooping sound in the data collected by gravitational-wave detectors at LIGO. Detection of first gravitational-wave in 2015 confirmed Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity.

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LIGO lab at CalTech

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An artist's impression of two merging black holes, producing gravitational waves.
Image Credit: National Science Foundation

The technique is expected to reveal the presence of thousands of previously hidden black holes by teasing out their faint whoops from a sea of static. Measuring the gravitational-wave background will allow us to study populations of black holes at vast distances. Someday, the technique may enable us to see gravitational waves from the Big Bang, hidden behind gravitational waves from black holes and neutron stars.
They will, effectively, be able to provide comprehensive information on astronomical phenomenon of all scales and over distant timelines.
Thus, when we study these silences long enough, a universal harmony reveals itself correcting our understanding of everything that ever was and every thing that ever will be.

THE SOUNDS OF SILENCE
LISTENING TO GRAVITATIONAL WAVES
my img

Stephen Hawking lost his ability to speak in 1985, more than three decades before the scientific community beamed his message of 'peace, hope and universal harmony' into a black hole 3500 years away, in loving memory of a man much beyond our times.
Stephen Hawking may have never recovered his real voice in his lifetime but his message will live on in the solitary silence of the universe for billions of years ahead.
It is an elementary human understanding that space is a virtual vacuum impermeable to noise. Yet, when we probe beyond our horizons, we find such regal wonders of an unimaginable scale, that we are left to ponder if the silences in space really mean that the universe isn't trying to communicate with us.
However, it is. The universe continues to speak to us in a million different ways. If we could just listen beyond the synthesized noises we blanket our planet with, the universe has stories to tell. Stories much beyond the Age of Man.

my img

An artist's impression of gravitational waves generated by binary neutron stars. US researchers said on Feb. 11 2016 they have detected gravitational waves, which physicist Albert Einstein first described 100 years ago as 'ripples in the fabric of space-time.'

Beyond the Age of his Planet.
Beyond the Age of our sun and stars.
The Universe has been around for a long time and we have only just begun to listen to it. Gravitational Waves are said to be ripples in the space-time fabric. They are, to put it in simple terms, mere messengers from the Cosmos.

They are speaking of mighty neutron star collisions,
Singing ballads of supernovas they once witnessed,
Relaying their swan songs for the dying stars
And whispering truths about what lies beyond our conscious mind.

my img

LIGO lab at CalTech

Scientists at LIGO, MIT and CalTech have only begun to study their forms and decrypt the tales they hold.
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a large-scale physics experiment and observatory designed to detect cosmic gravitational waves and to develop gravitational-wave observations as an astronomical tool.
The gravitational waves from black hole mergers imprint a distinctive whooping sound in the data collected by gravitational-wave detectors at LIGO. Detection of first gravitational-wave in 2015 confirmed Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity.

my img

An artist's impression of two merging black holes, producing gravitational waves.
Image Credit: National Science Foundation

The technique is expected to reveal the presence of thousands of previously hidden black holes by teasing out their faint whoops from a sea of static. Measuring the gravitational-wave background will allow us to study populations of black holes at vast distances. Someday, the technique may enable us to see gravitational waves from the Big Bang, hidden behind gravitational waves from black holes and neutron stars.
They will, effectively, be able to provide comprehensive information on astronomical phenomenon of all scales and over distant timelines.
Thus, when we study these silences long enough, a universal harmony reveals itself correcting our understanding of everything that ever was and every thing that ever will be.